MFA -The Green Guidelines

MFA -The Green Guidelines


The Sustainability Committee -

MFA's Green Guidelines for the food industry to approach its goal of sustainability. This is a comprehensive set of guidelines for members of the Massachusetts Food Association to increase their sustainability and lower their environmental impact on the community in which they serve.

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MASSACHUSETTS FOOD ASSOCIATION

SUSTAINABILITY COMMITTEE


TRISH APONTE - E.L. HARVEY & SONS

RICKY ASHENFELTER - SPOILER ALERT

JODI BEEBE - CLEARESULT

MICHAEL BLANEY, NATIONAL GRID

ROBERT DONNELLY  -  WHOLE FOODS MARKET

COURTNEY FAGAN  -  WAKEFERN FOOD CORP.

SUZANNE FORBES  -  WAKEFERN FOOD CORP.

KAREN FRANCZYK  -  WHOLE FOODS MARKET

SANDY GIANCOLA  -  BIG Y FOODS

DAVID GIBBONS, NATIONAL GRID

ROB GIULLEMIN, EPA

ANDREW GOLDBERG - RETAIL BUSINESS SERVICES

MATT GREENSTEIN - SPOILER ALERT

EDWARD HSIEH, MASS RECYCLE

GARY KUCHYT  -  BIG Y FOODS

TOM LANE  -  OCEAN SPRAY

JANET MCCARTHY - AHOLD USA

MARISSA NELSON, AHOLD USA

GEORGE PARMENTER  -  HANNAFORD

CHRIS RASYS  -  ROCHE BROS. SUPERMARKETS

KENDRICK REPKO - AHOLD USA

CATHY RESLER - OCEAN SPRAY

KRISTINA STEFANSKI  -  STOP & SHOP SUPERMARKETS

JASON WADSWORTH  -  WEGMANS FOOD MARKETS

MARCUS WARNER - NITCO





 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

               I.          RESOURCE CONSERVATION

A. ENERGY CONSERVATION

B. WATER CONSERVATION

C. WASTE REDUCTION & RECYCLING

D. GREEN BUILDING

 

            II.          POLLUTION PREVENTION

A. CLIMATE CHANGE ACTIONS

B. TRUCK FLEETS

C. HOUSEKEEPING & OPERATING PRACTICES

 

         III.          FINANCIAL PLANNING, PURCHASING AND PRODUCTS

A. LONG TERM FINANCIAL PLANNING

B. GENERAL SUPPLY PURCHASING

C. RETAIL PRODUCT PURCHASING

 

          IV.          COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

A. COMMUNITY GIVE-BACK

B. CONSUMER EDUCATION

 

             V.          EMPLOYEE RELATIONS

A. SUSTAINING EMPLOYEE WORKFORCE

 

          VI.          LEAN CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS MANAGEMENT

A.    WHAT IS LEAN CONSTRUCTION?

B.    WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?

C.    RECOMMENDED PROCESS FOR CMM

D.    TOOLS OF CMM

E.     PROGRAM RECOMMENDATIONS

F.     DEVELOP YOUR CMM PROGRAM

G.    DEVELOP A WRITTEN PROGRAM

H.    ESTABLISH WHAT’S NEEDED FOR PROGRAM

I.       THE 5 “S’s” IN LEAN CONSTRUCTION

J.      PLAN TO PREVENT WASTE

K.    THE 8 WASTES IN LEAN CONSTRUCTION

 

       VII.          APPENDIX

Massachusetts Food Association Member “Green Guidelines”

 

Overview

Climate change warnings, greenhouse gas initiatives, environmental awareness, sustainability programs and fluctuating energy costs, during a time of economic instability, are some of the public policy issues confronting the business community.  The Massachusetts food distribution trade understands the role our industry can play in being a leader in adopting programs and creating public awareness that realizes significant environmental benefits, preserves resources, conserves energy as well as helps reduce costs in operations.  The Massachusetts Food Association (MFA) is supporting a new campaign to endorse “green guidelines” that favorably impact the environment, enhance public education, benefit the communities in which we do business and create a model for other industries to emulate.

 

These guidelines are compiled as a resource for MFA members by the Massachusetts Food Association and the MFA Sustainability Committee.  This listing includes over 100 green actions which are ways that food companies in the state can become better stewards of the environment, reduce waste, save energy and become environmental leaders in the community.  Though the list is quite extensive, it is by no means complete.  The Association will add to this guide over time, and with support of agencies such as the MA Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP), MA Department of Energy Resources (DOER) and others, continue to find ways to assist MFA members to be the greenest they can be.

 

The Massachusetts Food Association represents and promotes the interests of the Commonwealth’s grocery and supermarket industry and serves as its unified voice, advocating on behalf of its members and providing a balanced perspective and clear information regarding issues affecting both the industry and the public at large.  This manual was developed with the assistance of the MFA Sustainability Sub-Committee.

 

The Massachusetts Food Association recognizes the efforts put forth by the New Jersey Food Council (NJFC) to create a model of Green Guidelines for its retail members in New Jersey, and would like to thank NJFC for allowing MFA to utilize those Guidelines as a resource to create our own for the Massachusetts food industry.

 

For questions or more information, please call us at (617)-542-3085 or email mafood@mafood.com.


I.        RESOURCE CONSERVATION

A.  ENERGY CONSERVATION The food distribution industry is a high end user of energy through many facets of use, including lighting, routine office equipment requirements, HVAC and refrigeration needs to deliver safe and healthful products efficiently to consumers.  Although the industry continuously strives for progressive efficiency, there is always room for improvement in these areas through such means as:

 

Lighting

1.      Conduct a comprehensive commercial energy audit of your facility to identify conservation measures (working with your utility, DOER or other contractor) (see appendix for link to listing).

2.      Complete a “Facility Energy Audit Program” available through your local utility company or educational institution.

3.      Replace facility lighting fixtures with those recommended by local energy companies in their energy audit.

4.      Replace existing standard fluorescent lamps and ballasts to four-foot, high efficiency florescent (T8) lamps or T5 fixtures/lamps and electronic ballasts.

5.      Use LED lighting in areas where feasible (exit signs, etc.).

6.      Use day lighting or skylights for a portion of indoor lighting needs, switch off general lighting as a result.

7.      Use lighting output controls such as:

§  Occupancy sensors.

§  Photocells (motion sensors).

§  Bypass/Delay timers.

§  Time clock (adjusted seasonally).

8.      Disconnect used ballast in fluorescent fixtures that are not currently in use and replace burned out lamps quickly to avoid ballast damage.

9.      Clean light fixtures (reflectors and lenses) once a year.

 

Office Equipment

10.   Purchase EPEAT registered electronic products (or that have energy savings features) such as computers (includes Monitor, Scanner, Printer), Copy/Fax machines, or multifunction devices.

11.   Activate all energy savings features, if available.

12.   Plug all equipment that can be turned off into time switches to make sure they are turned off after hours.

 

HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning Systems)

13.   Use natural gas system instead of an electrical system.

14.   Capture exhaust heat from refrigeration system for water heating or other use through a heat recovery system where feasible.

15.   Install reflective or light colored roofing to minimize summer heat gain.

16.   Insulate all indoor and outdoor heating, and cooling pipes and ducts.

17.   Install timer switches on radiant space heaters.

18.   Use ceiling fans to circulate air.

19.   Replace or supplement an A/C system with an evaporative cooler.

20.   Use economizers on A/C to increase air circulation.

21.   Change HVAC filters on a regular schedule.

22.   Use HVAC output control, bypass timers and/or time clocks.

23.   Set thermostats at/or below 68 degrees for heating and at/or above 78 degrees for cooling; adjust accordingly for after hours.

24.   Use window film or shades to reduce solar heat gain.

25.   Have your system re-commissioned every 2 years or on a regular basis.

 

Refrigeration Systems for retail, perishable, storage or other similar operations

26.   Use an eco-friendly refrigerant (see appendix for link to listing).

27.   Explore usage of a Free Air system if applicable (see appendix for link to listing).

28.   Install controller for running times temperature control with an alarm system that signals when temperatures are too high or too low.

29.   Keep air discharge and return grilles clear through effective case/stock management.

30.   Install a monitoring system to detect refrigerant leaks.

31.   Regularly check all seals on freezer and cooler doors, replace as necessary.

32.   Install anti-sweat controls in freezer doors.

33.   Use night shades on open coolers.

34.   Have your system re-commissioned every 2 years.

35.   Install vending misers (timers) on beverage machines.

 

 

Other Energy Conservation Measures

36.   Become Energy Star Certified through the EPA’s Benchmarking Program.

37.   Use signs to remind staff to turn off lights and keep doors (cooler and outside) closed.

 

B.  WATER CONSERVATIONOur industry’s needs for this valuable resource have forced us to reevaluate its continuous use through measures that reduce its demand while increasing the efficiency and reusability of water, which can be accomplished by utilizing the following:

 

Water Conservation and Leaks

38.   Regularly review all consumption information provided on your water bill.  Learn to read your meter.  Compare current consumption to the prior year during the same period.  If consumption is abnormally high, check toilets and other fixtures for leakage and read your water meter during off hours to detect involuntary consumption.

39.   Install and/or replace all manual faucets with automatic shut off faucets.

40.   Use low flow faucets and sprayers in pot wash areas of food preparation spots.

41.   Have your local wastewater utility or a water conservation service conduct a commercial water audit of your facility to help identify the conservation measures to use at your facility.

42.   Regularly check for and repair all water leaks in your facility.

 

Sanitary Fixtures

43.   Replace existing toilets with water conserving 1.6-gallon maximum flush models.

44.   Retrofit existing pre-1980 five-gallon flush toilets with the quick closing flappers to lower flush to 3.5 gallons per flush.

45.   Adjust urinals to 1.0 gallons per flush.

46.   Use low-flow lavatory faucet aerators (1.5 gallons per minute or less).

47.   Use waterless urinals.

 

Landscaping

48.    Implement storm water best management practices such as bioswales or storm water retention basins.

49.   Install a permeable paving system or other storm water reduction surface in parking lots.

50.   Use plants that are drought tolerant (water conserving) and native to the area.

51.   Use irrigation bags for rainwater capture on tree plantings.

52.   Install rain shut-off devices or moisture sensors to override automatic irrigation when adequate moisture exists.

53.   Limit the number of days lawns are irrigated to a maximum of 3-4 days per week during the summer, 2-3 days in the spring and fall and shut off in winter months.  Trees and shrubs should be watered no more than 2 days per week in the summer, 1-2 days in the spring and fall and not in the winter.

54.   For landscaping on slopes or in narrow planting strips, prevent runoff by scheduling multiple run times for short periods (3-5 minutes), with at least an hour between water applications.

55.   Valves are separated based on water use (hydro zone). (Example: Grass lawns will always require more water then shrub beds.)  Change your watering times and zones accordingly.

56.   Apply at least two inches of mulch in all non-turf planting areas.  Use local compost when practical.

57.   Control sprinkler discharge by measurement of output so that no more than 1.5” is discharged per week.

 

C.  WASTE REDUCTION AND RECYCLING The food distribution industry has historically been a leader in waste reduction and recycling, beginning with cardboard, shrink wrap and product waste being recycled and/or turned into an alternative, useful product such as compost.  Efforts to continue efficiency in these areas can be accomplished by practicing the following:

58.   For retail and other applicable members, participate in the joint MFA/DEP MOU efforts: 1. Supermarket Recycling Program Certification (SRPC), which encourages supermarkets to develop sustainable programs for recycling and reusing organics and other materials, diverting them from the waste stream and landfills while turning them into a useful product.  If conducted in at least 80% of a business’s locations, regulatory relief is granted by DEP.  As of July 2010, nearly 200 retail food stores were participating in this effort, saving on tipping fees and reducing the amount of compostable materials from going to landfills, with nearly 100 certified (see appendix for link to listing); 2. Disposable Bag Reduction efforts to reduce the distribution of disposable bags, both paper and plastic, while increasing the distribution and use of reusable bags.  Such efforts are proactive and help restrict local and state mandates of a ban and/or tax.  As of July 2010, disposable bag distribution was reduced by 25% since the inception of the Memorandum of Understanding between DEP and MFA with 12 supermarket chains representing over 380 retail food store locations participating.

59.   Join the EPA WasteWise Program (see appendix for link to listing).

60.   Have a waste audit/assessment completed for your facility (by a waste company, academic institution or independent consultant) to help identify the waste reduction, reuse and recycling practices that would best work for your facility and review recommendations.  Members should contact MA DEP or their municipal or county recycling coordinator for information about local markets and general recycling support.

61.   Prepare an annual tonnage report that documents your recycling efforts or food donation programs.

62.   Source separate and reuse and/or recycle the following:

§  Organic Materials (food, landscaping, etc. diverted for composting).

§  Electronic waste (computers, registers, etc.).

§  Bulky waste (fixtures, equipment).

§  Used cooking oil recycled for energy, locally.

§  Rendering for animal wastes.

§  Cardboard.

§  Waxed cardboard (if separate from organics).

§  Commingled containers (glass, metal, plastic).

§  Rechargeable batteries.

§  Inkjet or other printer cartridges.

§  Mixed paper.

§  Wood pallets.

§  Other packing materials (e.g. shrink/stretch film, bubble wrap, foam, peanuts).

§  Beverage bottles and cans (consumed by workplace associates).

§  Rigid plastic pails and containers emptied within each department.

63.   Offer consumer recycling (public) when feasible for such materials as:

§  Plastic shopping bags including dry-cleaning and other stretch films (see 58).

§  Reverse vending machines or bottle deposit return systems as required.

§  Currency, as through a Coin Star machine.

64.   Make double sided printing and copying a standard practice.

65.   Remove your company’s name from junk mail lists and purge your own mailing lists to eliminate duplication.

66.   Use software programs that allow you to fax and e-mail directly to/from your computer without printing.

67.   Use eco-friendly and/or reusable packaging alternatives including:

§  Milk crates, soda jugs or other vendor provided reusable packaging.

§  Reusable pallets.

§  Reusable distributor containers (such as plastic totes, bread trays, floral or produce flats and boxes/crates).

§  Disposable containers for customer purchases (items that are made from biomaterials or are recyclable).

§  Install electronic swipe cards in lieu of employee time cards.

 

D.  GREEN BUILDING Environmentally friendly, or “green”, sustainable structures have become a top priority for the food industry, as business operators continue to search for ways to reduce their carbon footprint, increase efficiency and reduce energy costs.  By evaluating the following guidelines, further progress can be made in these areas:

68.     Incorporate Green Building practices into construction and renovation projects. Use    guidelines such as:

·       LEED certification for new construction.

·       LEED certification for existing buildings.

·       LEED certification for commercial interiors.

69.    Use environmentally preferable building materials such as:

·       Flooring.

·       Wall coverings.

·       Furniture.

·       Insulation.

Note:  materials should be third party verified eco-friendly (Green Seal, FSC, EcoLogo, or similar).

70.    Install a Green Roof.

 

II.      POLLUTION PREVENTION

A.  CLIMATE CHANGE ACTIONS Further measures can also be taken to reduce the carbon footprint created by our industry during the delivery, acceptance and storage of product, including the following:

71.   Join the EPA Climate Leaders, Green Chill, Green Power Partners, or SmartWay Transportation Programs (see appendix for link to listing).

72.   Install a clean energy source at your facility (e.g. Solar panels, fuel cell).

73.   Reduce the impact of trucking fleets and distribution network by using backhauling, hybrid technologies, biofuel, or other sustainable practices if applicable.

74.   Purchase clean energy offsets for your facility’s use, at least 25%.

75.   Post no idling signs or encourage vendors waiting to unload or at loading docks to turn off engines.

76.   Reduce idling times through idling time allotments or “no idling zones”.

 

B. TRUCK FLEETS (if applicable)For operators with truck fleets or those involved in the transportation of product, several steps can be taken to conserve fossil fuels, increase reliance on alternative fuels, reduce emissions, increase recycling of engine liquids and parts, reduce maintenance discharge pollutants and other environmental areas of concern with vehicle maintenance (see appendix for link to listing):

77.   Send used lead-acid batteries to an off-site recycler. (The main pollution prevention options for used batteries are to keep the batteries intact and then recycle them.).

78.   Install reusable oil filters on at least 25% of your fleet.

79.   Recycle waste oil, transmission and hydraulic oil.

80.   Use cube system to maximize truck routing capacity.

81.   Extend the life of your engine oil by at least 25% in 25% or more of your vehicles. (Example: use synthetic blend oil, which changes the life of the oil from 3,000 miles to 5,000 miles).

82.   Substitute the less toxic propylene glycol for ethylene glycol in 25% of fleet vehicles.

83.   Explore possible use of biofuels.

84.   Recycle all of your waste antifreeze on-site.

85.   Achieve zero discharge by not discharging any process wastewater (e.g. floor parts or steam cleaning; car washing) to the sanitary sewer or storm drain systems.

86.   Use dry cleanup method-for floor cleaning. (Example: Use a Zamboni self-contained floor cleaner, which vacuums excess water.).

87.   Seal off all floor drains, trenches, sumps and oil/water separators.  Prevent all shop fluids from entering storm drains.

 

C. HOUSEKEEPING & OPERATING PRACTICESDaily upkeep and inventory business procedures and operations can also be evaluated to decrease their environmental impact through reasonable steps with employee involvement, including:

Cleaning Products and Procedures

88.   Use Green Seal (or equivalent) Certified cleaners and degreasers.

89.   Use an alternative launderer for uniforms and linens – such as CO2 or Wet Cleaning technologies.

90.   Use Green Seal (or equivalent) Certified floor stripper and wax.

Inventory control procedures to reduce waste generation and material

91.   Minimize the inventory of fluids and chemicals onsite.  Stock only what you need and order materials on a “just-in-time” basis.

92.   Work with vendors to return excess or expired stock.

Employee Programs

93.   Have an active (meets at least quarterly with representation from a majority of the departments) Green Team or Environmental Committee in your facility.

94.   Include environmental education in employee training.

95.   Offer employees incentives to use public transportation or carpooling for commuting.

 

III.     FINANCIAL PLANNING, PURCHASING AND PRODUCTS

A. LONG TERM SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL PLANNINGLong term financial planning helps with sustaining your business while showing a commitment to the community:

96.   Consider a sustainable strategic or long-term plan that projects capital needs and performance at least 3 years into the future.

B.  GENERAL SUPPLY PURCHASINGOther business and administrative practices on a daily basis can reduce a company’s impact on the environment by implementing the following procedures:

97.   Implement an Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Program for office supplies.

98.   Buy and use, recycled content products, such as:

§  Office supplies (paper, ink cartridges, folders).

§  Paper towels, tissues, etc.

§  Promotional materials/flyers.

§  Boxes and bags for packaging consumer purchases.

§  Garbage pails and garbage bags.

§  Parking lot curb stops, picnic tables, benches.

 

C.  RETAIL PRODUCTS and PURCHASINGRetail food product inventories, through their distribution and purchasing by consumers can also be evaluated from “farm to table” to lower their impact on the environment and create sustainable supply chains through the following steps:

99.   Stock certified seafood products and label them as such (see appendix for link to listing).

100.             Stock USDA Certified Organic options for a majority of product categories.

101.             Develop a local products program – e.g. an aisle, marketing campaign, or special merchandise section.

102.             Offer reusable bags for sale (see 58).

103.             Offer recycled content products for sale such as your own compost (see 58) or green cleaning products.

104.             Offer refillable water or other items in bulk for purchase.

 

IV.     COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

 

A.  COMMUNITY GIVE-BACK and GREEN INCENTIVESParticipation in the community has long been advantageous for the food industry and helps to sustain hunger programs while decreasing the amount of wasted product through such steps as listed:

105.             Participate in a local food rescue program such as donating to the Community Food Bank or Pantry to help end hunger in the community and state.  Also, support locally grown gleaning efforts, support Feeding America initiatives (see appendix for link to listing), encourage community support for in-store food drives, etc.

106.             Donate a percentage of sales or profits to environmental non-profit organizations each year.

107.             Partner with a community organization on an environmental project (such as a Clean Communities Day).

108.             Provide customer incentives for bag-reuse.

109.              Provide bike racks for employees, shoppers, etc.

110.             Provide information about public transportation options to and from your location to customers and vendors (where applicable).

111.             Check/update with each community on their waste disposal programs (sale of appropriate trash bags, pay per throw, community posters promoting curbside, etc.).

112.             Check/update with each community on what they recycle, particularly in light of rapid changes to sustainable packaging within the industry.

113.             Support and encourage participation in Earth Day (April 22nd annually) (see appendix for link to listing), America Recycles Day (November 15 annually) (see appendix for link to listing) & other community activist activities when appropriate.

 

B.  CONSUMER EDUCATION – Continuing to help and educate consumers to reduce their environmental impact and providing useful information helps the community at large through such simple steps as listed:

114.             Include environmental information/publications in your café, vestibule, or bulletin board.

115.             Include environmental education in your printed or electronic promotional materials e.g. weekly circular, website.

116.             Work with suppliers on environmental promotions.

 

V.      EMPLOYEE RELATIONS

 

A.  SUSTAINING EMPLOYEE WORKFORCE – This creates an opportunity to increase employee morale and demonstrates that your business cares about employees which could ultimately translate into better customer service.

117.             Encourage and contribute financially to continued education for employees.

118.             Require and pay for managers to attend managerial training classes.

119.             Allow employees access to a company employee handbook.

120.             At least once a year and on a set schedule conduct employee reviews.

121.             Have a diversity hiring policy.

122.             Incorporate sustainability orientation in new employee training (training video demonstrating green aspects of the operation (recycling, energy efficiency, water conservation, etc.).

VI.     LEAN CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS MANAGEMENT (LCMM)

 

A.  WHAT IS LEAN CONSTRUCTION? – The core of lean construction is to maximize value while minimizing waste of all types, eliminating all physical waste along the entire value stream and creating processes that require less labor, space, capital, time and human effort.  This is achieved by following  LEAN principles for feasibility and due diligence, planning, design, construction, operations and maintenance so that integrated project delivery and lean construction are synonymous.

 

B. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT? – To control and keep down costs, prevent underutilization, increase efficiency and environmental benefits, including:

123.             Financial exposure of existing conditions: Avoidance of increased transportation       and waste disposal costs associated with non-lean means and methods.

124.             Reduction of wasted material costs.

125.             Maximized utilization of Human Resources.

126.             Enhanced cost avoidance and financial improvement opportunities.

127.             Increased efficiencies associated with replicability.

128.             Environmental Co-benefits, including: tons diverted, Co2 reductions, KwH reductions.

129.             Brand improvement and communications opportunities.

130.             Benchmarking, Performance Tracking and Reporting Benefits.

 

C.  RECOMMENDED PROCESS FOR LCMM

131.             Identify potential waste generation sources and characterize waste.

132.             Institute the 3R’s principle in Section L below – Reduce, Repurpose/Reuse, Recycle.

133.             Develop a written program.

134.             Implement the program.

135.             Develop metrics, track and document the program.

 

 

 

D.  THE “TOOLS” OF LCMM

136.             Identify waste generation – Locate the sources and/or causes of all eight (8) types of project waste as identified in Section K.

137.             Design to prevent waste – Redesign or modify design approach to eliminate associated waste streams.

138.             Plann to prevent waste – Establish effective project logistics management protocols to eliminate waste.

139.             Implement construction techniques and jobsite methods to reduce and reuse – Engineer and pursue constructability requirements to minimize material, operational and human resource wastes and reuse any waste generated where possible.

140.             Purchase to prevent waste – Establish and implement effective supply chain management protocols to eliminate waste.

141.             Repurpose and recycle waste – Reuse, repurpose or recycle all waste generated through the project.

142.             Waste to Energy conversion – Waste generated that cannot be reused, repurposed or recycled, dispose of through a waste to energy solution.

 

E.  PROGRAM RECOMMENDATIONS

143.             Start small.

144.             Take on only what can be successfully managed.

145.             Get commitment from executive management.

146.             Plan (it’s not the plan that really counts, it’s the planning).

147.             COMMUNICATE.

 

F.  DEVELOP YOUR LCMM PROGRAM

148.             Establish your vision – Determine what motivates the waste management plan and why.

149.             Establish your mission – Establish goals, targeted reduction thresholds and KPI’s for the project.

150.             Outline Master Plan – Develop means, methods and strategy for accomplishing the mission.  Identify required resources and allocate roles and responsibilities to project stakeholders.

151.             Develop short and long term implementation plan – Apply means, methods and strategy to scheduling, logistics and planning efforts to establish workflow, timeline and deliverables.

152.             Identify the business case and provide example case studies – Develop the business case to justify cost of proposed approach and substantiate with case study analogues.

 

G.  DEVELOP A WRITTEN PROGRAM

153.             Identify and target waste producing activities.

154.             Plan site logistics to reduce unnecessary movement resulting in wasted labor and damaged materials.

155.             Use JIT (just in time) delivery of materials.

156.             IMPLEMENT the program.

157.             Benchmark and track results.

158.             Contrast results and projections to identify Triple Bottom Line improvements: financial, social, environmental.

159.             Report on program performance to project stakeholders and author final report at project conclusion.

 

H.  ESTABLISH WHAT’S NEEDED FOR PROGRAM

160.             Metrics – If you can’t measure it, it doesn’t exist.

161.             CMM language for your Owners Performance Requirements (OPR), Basis of Design (BOD) or master Planning Document(s).

162.             CMM specifications for all contract documents.

163.             CMM training for “in-house” and subcontracted services.

164.             Business case ROI requirements.

165.             Commitment to continuous learning and improvement.

 

I.  THE FIVE S’s IN LEAN CONSTRUCTION – The following five principles should be followed through the process of LCMM:

166.             Sort: Remove unnecessary items and dispose of them properly, eliminate obstacles and unnecessary items to make work easier, reduce chances of being disturbed/distracted and prevent accumulation of unnecessary items, evaluation of necessary items with regard to cost or other factors.

167.             Straighten: Arrangement of all necessary items for ease of identification and use, prevention of loss and waste of time, ensuring first come, first serve basis, make workflow smooth, easy, set in order and apply streamlined approach.

168.             Shine: Maintain completely clean workplace and use as part of an inspection, which will prevent machinery and equipment deterioration and keep workplace safe and easy to work.

169.             Standardize: Maintain high standards of housekeeping and workplace organization, cleanliness and orderliness, maintain everything in order, in the right place according to its standard.

170.             Sustain: Keep all in working order so that LCMM is performed without being told.

 

J.  PLAN TO PREVENT WASTE

171.             Develop a written program.

172.             Develop responsibility matrix.

173.             Establish metrics to measure program impact (and prove bottom line project financial improvements).

174.             Eliminate the use of any hazardous or regulated materials (OSHA, NYSEPA, etc.).

 

K.  THE EIGHT (8) WASTES IN LEAN CONSTRUCTION

175.             Scrap/Rework/Defects/Reconciliations.

176.             Transportation/material or information handling - Jobsite material movement, uncoordinated trucking deliveries, lack of identification/resorting.

177.             Motion – Searching for tools, materials, equipment, office supplies, information on a computer, drawings – anything.

178.             Waiting/Delays – Non-value added time such as waiting for RFI’s, tools, instructions, materials or other work to be completed.

179.             Inventory – Lack of pre-planning for what parts are needed, fabrication on job too early, over-purchasing “just in case”, not returning excess materials to suppliers.

180.             Overproduction – Creating extra anything.  Anything at jobsite that ends up in dumpster.

 

L.  THE THREE R’s – REDUCE, REPURPOSE, RECYCLE (Prioritized)

181.             Reduce/eliminate waste material, optimize transportation and labor.

182.             Salvage, repurpose and reuse materials including “clean” conversion to energy.

183.             Recycle materials where the recycling process is cost effective and energy and carbon neutral.

184.             Utilize materials with significant recycled content.

185.             Prioritize regional materials acquisition (within a maximum of 500 mile radius of project site).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VI.                                                 - APPENDIX

The Massachusetts Food Association does not in any way endorse or recommend any of the individuals or organizations presented on this list nor does the Association preclude anyone not on the list.  The Association does not evaluate those listed and does not guarantee the success of their programs.  Please note that this is not a comprehensive list and, although it may be periodically updated, there is no guarantee that all information is current.  You may also contact industry and regulatory organizations as well as telephone directories for further listings.  Directory last updated 9/2010.

DESCRIPTION, (STEP #), FOLLOWED BY: LINK:

Link to MA Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EOEEA) Energy Efficiency Programs (1):

http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eoeeasubtopic&L=4&L0=Home&L1=Energy%2c+Utilities+%26+Clean+Technologies&L2=Energy+Efficiency&L3=Utility+Regulations&sid=Eoeea

 

Link to MA Department of Environmental Resources for Grants & Technical Assistance, Guidance & Technical Assistance and Key Inititatives (1):

http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eoeeaagencylanding&L=5&L0=Home&L1=Grants+%26+Technical+Assistance&L2=Guidance+%26+Technical+Assistance&L3=Agencies+and+Divisions&L4=Department+of+Energy+Resources+(DOER)&sid=Eoeea

 

Link to MA EOEEA homepage (1):

http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eoeeahomepage&L=1&L0=Home&sid=Eoeea

Link to MA Department of Public Utilities homepage (1):

http://www.mass.gov/?pageID=eoeeaagencylanding&L=5&L0=Home&L1=Grants+%26+Technical+Assistance&L2=Guidance+%26+Technical+Assistance&L3=Agencies+and+Divisions&L4=Department+of+Public+Utilities+(DPU)&sid=Eoeea

 

Link to a full listing of eco-friendly refrigerant substitutes (26):

http://epa.gov/ozone/snap/refrigerants/lists/foodref.html

 

Link to the free air company (27):

http://freeaire.com/

 

Link to Supermarket Recycling Program Certification (58):

http://www.mass.gov/dep/recycle/supermkt.htm

 

Link to WasteWise EPA Program (59):

http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/partnerships/wastewise/index.htm

 

Link to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency “Smartway” Program to save fuel, money and the environment (71, 77 – 87): http://www.epa.gov/smartway/

Link to EPA Transportation, Air Quality and Climate (IIA & B):

http://www.epa.gov/otaq/climate/relatedlinks.htm

 

Link to list of third party sustainable certification programs (99):

http://www.fmi.org/docs/sustainability/sustainability_resources.pdf

 

Link to Feeding America (105):

http://feedingamerica.org/

 

Link to Earth Day website (113):

http://www.earthday.net/

 

Link to America Recycles Day (113):

www.americarecyclesday.org

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MFA -The Green Guidelines


The Sustainability Committee -

MFA's Green Guidelines for the food industry to approach its goal of sustainability. This is a comprehensive set of guidelines for members of the Massachusetts Food Association to increase their sustainability and lower their environmental impact on the community in which they serve.

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